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Ecce Homo Dover Art Collections Ebook |

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Ecce Homo Dover Art Collections Ebook |

Ecce homo (dover art collections)



Contact your hosting provider letting them know your web server is not completing requests. An Error 522 means that the request was able to connect to your web server, but that the request didn't finish. The most likely cause is that something on your server is hogging resources. Additional troubleshooting information here.

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Ecce homo ("behold the man", Ecclesiastical Latin:  [ˈɛttʃɛ ˈɔmo] , Classical Latin:  [ˈɛkkɛ ˈhɔmoː] ) are the Latin words used by Pontius Pilate in the Vulgate translation of John 19:5 , when he presents a scourged Jesus Christ , bound and crowned with thorns , to a hostile crowd shortly before his Crucifixion . The original Greek is Ίδε ό άνθρωπος ( Ide ho anthropos ). The Douay-Rheims Bible translates the phrase into English as "Behold the man!" [John 19:5] The scene has been widely depicted in Christian art .

A scene of the Ecce Homo is a standard component of cycles illustrating the Passion and Life of Christ in art. It follows the Flagellation of Christ , the Crowning with thorns and the Mocking of Christ , the last two often being combined. The usual depiction shows Pilate and Christ, the mocking crowd and parts of the city of Jerusalem .

The first depictions of the ecce homo scene in the arts appear in the 9th and 10th centuries in Syrian - Byzantine culture. Western depictions in the Middle Ages that often seem to depict the ecce homo scene, (and are usually interpreted as such) more often than not only show the crowning of thorns and the mocking of Christ, (cf. the Egbert Codex and the Codex Aureus Epternacensis ) which precede the actual ecce homo scene in the Bible. The independent image only developed around 1400, probably in Burgundy, but then rapidly became extremely popular, especially in Northern Europe. [1]

The motif of the lone figure of a suffering Christ who seems to be staring directly at the observer, enabling him/her to personally identify with the events of the Passion, arose in the late Middle Ages. A parallel development was that the similar motifs of the Man of Sorrow and Christ at rest increased in importance. The subject was used repeatedly in later prints (for example, by Jacques Callot and Rembrandt ), the paintings of the Renaissance and the Baroque , as well as in Baroque sculptures.

Hieronymus Bosch painted his first Ecce Homo during the 1470s. [2] He returned to the subject in 1490 to paint in a characteristically Netherlandish style, with deep perspective and a surreal ghostly image of praying monks in the lower left-hand corner.

In 1498, Albrecht Dürer depicted the suffering of Christ in the Ecce Homo of his Great Passion, print series in unusually close relation with his self-portrait, leading to a reinterpretation of the motif as a metaphor for the suffering of the artist. James Ensor used the ecce homo motif in his ironic print Christ and the Critics (1891), in which he portrayed himself as Christ.

WikiArt.org allows unlimited copying, distributing and displaying of the images of public domain artworks solely . We use here Copyright term based on authors' deaths according to U.S. Copyright Law , that is 70 years. In other countries, the duration of copyright term may differ. Please check here copyright length according to your country's legislation before you consider reproducing images borrowed from Wikipaintings.org

Artworks protected by copyright are supposed to be used only for contemplation. Images of that type of artworks are prohibited for copying, printing, or any kind of reproducing and communicating to public since these activities may be considered copyright infringement .

Contact your hosting provider letting them know your web server is not completing requests. An Error 522 means that the request was able to connect to your web server, but that the request didn't finish. The most likely cause is that something on your server is hogging resources. Additional troubleshooting information here.

Cloudflare Ray ID: 3e363e4c50869053 • Your IP : 62.109.12.231 • Performance & security by Cloudflare

Ecce homo ("behold the man", Ecclesiastical Latin:  [ˈɛttʃɛ ˈɔmo] , Classical Latin:  [ˈɛkkɛ ˈhɔmoː] ) are the Latin words used by Pontius Pilate in the Vulgate translation of John 19:5 , when he presents a scourged Jesus Christ , bound and crowned with thorns , to a hostile crowd shortly before his Crucifixion . The original Greek is Ίδε ό άνθρωπος ( Ide ho anthropos ). The Douay-Rheims Bible translates the phrase into English as "Behold the man!" [John 19:5] The scene has been widely depicted in Christian art .

A scene of the Ecce Homo is a standard component of cycles illustrating the Passion and Life of Christ in art. It follows the Flagellation of Christ , the Crowning with thorns and the Mocking of Christ , the last two often being combined. The usual depiction shows Pilate and Christ, the mocking crowd and parts of the city of Jerusalem .

The first depictions of the ecce homo scene in the arts appear in the 9th and 10th centuries in Syrian - Byzantine culture. Western depictions in the Middle Ages that often seem to depict the ecce homo scene, (and are usually interpreted as such) more often than not only show the crowning of thorns and the mocking of Christ, (cf. the Egbert Codex and the Codex Aureus Epternacensis ) which precede the actual ecce homo scene in the Bible. The independent image only developed around 1400, probably in Burgundy, but then rapidly became extremely popular, especially in Northern Europe. [1]

The motif of the lone figure of a suffering Christ who seems to be staring directly at the observer, enabling him/her to personally identify with the events of the Passion, arose in the late Middle Ages. A parallel development was that the similar motifs of the Man of Sorrow and Christ at rest increased in importance. The subject was used repeatedly in later prints (for example, by Jacques Callot and Rembrandt ), the paintings of the Renaissance and the Baroque , as well as in Baroque sculptures.

Hieronymus Bosch painted his first Ecce Homo during the 1470s. [2] He returned to the subject in 1490 to paint in a characteristically Netherlandish style, with deep perspective and a surreal ghostly image of praying monks in the lower left-hand corner.

In 1498, Albrecht Dürer depicted the suffering of Christ in the Ecce Homo of his Great Passion, print series in unusually close relation with his self-portrait, leading to a reinterpretation of the motif as a metaphor for the suffering of the artist. James Ensor used the ecce homo motif in his ironic print Christ and the Critics (1891), in which he portrayed himself as Christ.

Contact your hosting provider letting them know your web server is not completing requests. An Error 522 means that the request was able to connect to your web server, but that the request didn't finish. The most likely cause is that something on your server is hogging resources. Additional troubleshooting information here.

Cloudflare Ray ID: 3e363e4c50869053 • Your IP : 62.109.12.231 • Performance & security by Cloudflare



 
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