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Maestro Dobel | Products

Our new search experience requires JavaScript to be enabled. Please enable JavaScript on your browser , then try again .Even Donald Trump could learn something from the braggadocio on display at Maestro Dobel, which claims (among other superlatives), to maestro dobel
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Jan 07, 2018:
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Maestro Dobel | Products

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Even Donald Trump could learn something from the braggadocio on display at Maestro Dobel, which claims (among other superlatives), to be “the first-ever diamond tequila” … “unlike any other aged tequila” … the “result of a proprietary blending and filtration technique.” … “the liquid embodiment of my passion for tequila” … the result of “six generations of my family’s dedication to crafting the finest tequilas available” … and “a renaissance — a new way of thinking about and enjoying tequila.”

That’s a mouthful, and considering the just-released tequila costs $75 a bottle, it better stack up, eh? I put the good Maestro to the test and found it really intriguing and truly unusual in a world where many tequilas, even super-premium ones, can taste a lot alike.

Maestro Dobel is indeed a “new way” of making tequila: For starters, it’s a nearly clear, white spirit, but inside the bottle is aged tequila. At least three different aged tequilas are found in the blend inside the bottle (including reposado, anejo, and extra anejo expressions), but the spirit is then filtered to “gently expel congeners and colors from the tequila.” The how is “proprietary.” It’s kind of like the idea behind Crystal Pepsi : Flavor, yes. Color, no.

The flavor is wholly unexpected, especially if you’re not in on the whole decolorization thing: There’s vanilla, butterscotch, and woody oak where you’d normally get just the heat and vegetal notes of silver tequila. Agave is there, but understated, well mellowed by the aging process. You actually get more agave in the aroma than the taste, especially after the spirit opens up a little in the glass.

But for a blend of such well-aged tequilas, Dobel does clearly lose something along the way during all this filtration, and one can only imagine while sipping this mellow, almost “light” tequila, what the original base spirits must have tasted like. Is the colorless thing a gimmick or a real benefit to the drinker? If I feel like a million bucks tomorrow (those “expelled congeners” are what allegedly give you a hangover), that will be the real test to see whether Dobel is worth its Diamonds.

As a side note, the bottle alone deserves some discussion. It comes in an overly-tall decanter, with agave-like spikes molded into the lower portion of the glass. The base of the bottle is embedded into a built-in, metal coaster, and the label is forged from metal, too. Each bottle is individually numbered (mine is #292), dated, and signed.

Reserva del Maestro Dobel Diamond Reposado Tequila, a 100% Agave blend of Reposado, Anejo, and Extra Anejo Tequilas which have been gently filtered giving the Tequila an incredible Diamond Clarity and crispness.

Juan Dobel, working with Maestros Marco Anguiano and Luis Yerenas, wanted to create his own brand and offer Tequila Aficionados something truly unique. Each Agave used is grown for 8 to 10 years, and hand selected at one of a small number of our family's best quality producing ranches. This hand-crafted product is produced in small batches and aged in new oak casks from Southern Europe.

Juan-Dobel’s dedication to providing the finest hand-crafted tequila extends to Maestro Dobel’s meticulous packaging. Each imposing bottle is built on a thick metallic base and is emblazoned with a unique crystal-cut design. Each bottle is filled and labeled by hand and then individually numbered. Unique for tequila, Dobel recognizes the ranch from which the 8-10 year-old agave was harvested.

Tequila Reserva del Maestro * Tasted 10-21-08 * Riedel Tequila Glass

Appearance: very light straw, clear - full body and tears
Aroma: mild alcohol, light nose of fermented grapes, coffee, oak and vanilla
Initial Taste: sweet nut and chocolate, mild spice
Spirit Body: fruit and butter, hints of vanilla and mint, thick and warm
Finish / Aftertaste: warm and smooth finish, medium chocolate and mint aftertaste

A unique and mild spirit, containing many smooth aromas and flavors, minus the standard Agave attributes. Very drinkable. Tasted blind it would be difficult to categorize.

When I drank this tequila one word usually came to mind: dynamic. Every time I drank it I experienced a new taste. It was great. It was gone in no time though.

This was my first non blanco tequila aside from some mini bottles here and there.

The price on here is perhaps outdated or I just got really lucky when I bought it for $31.99. I would purchase this tequila again and would probably pay upwards of $50.00 if I had to.

Very disappointing tequila. The flavor was sharp, not smooth at all. I expected much, much more from this premium-priced tequila, and everyone I've shared it with has agreed that this is not worthy of the high price, nor the very high reviews it has received. Avoid this one.

Our new search experience requires JavaScript to be enabled. Please enable JavaScript on your browser , then try again .

Even Donald Trump could learn something from the braggadocio on display at Maestro Dobel, which claims (among other superlatives), to be “the first-ever diamond tequila” … “unlike any other aged tequila” … the “result of a proprietary blending and filtration technique.” … “the liquid embodiment of my passion for tequila” … the result of “six generations of my family’s dedication to crafting the finest tequilas available” … and “a renaissance — a new way of thinking about and enjoying tequila.”

That’s a mouthful, and considering the just-released tequila costs $75 a bottle, it better stack up, eh? I put the good Maestro to the test and found it really intriguing and truly unusual in a world where many tequilas, even super-premium ones, can taste a lot alike.

Maestro Dobel is indeed a “new way” of making tequila: For starters, it’s a nearly clear, white spirit, but inside the bottle is aged tequila. At least three different aged tequilas are found in the blend inside the bottle (including reposado, anejo, and extra anejo expressions), but the spirit is then filtered to “gently expel congeners and colors from the tequila.” The how is “proprietary.” It’s kind of like the idea behind Crystal Pepsi : Flavor, yes. Color, no.

The flavor is wholly unexpected, especially if you’re not in on the whole decolorization thing: There’s vanilla, butterscotch, and woody oak where you’d normally get just the heat and vegetal notes of silver tequila. Agave is there, but understated, well mellowed by the aging process. You actually get more agave in the aroma than the taste, especially after the spirit opens up a little in the glass.

But for a blend of such well-aged tequilas, Dobel does clearly lose something along the way during all this filtration, and one can only imagine while sipping this mellow, almost “light” tequila, what the original base spirits must have tasted like. Is the colorless thing a gimmick or a real benefit to the drinker? If I feel like a million bucks tomorrow (those “expelled congeners” are what allegedly give you a hangover), that will be the real test to see whether Dobel is worth its Diamonds.

As a side note, the bottle alone deserves some discussion. It comes in an overly-tall decanter, with agave-like spikes molded into the lower portion of the glass. The base of the bottle is embedded into a built-in, metal coaster, and the label is forged from metal, too. Each bottle is individually numbered (mine is #292), dated, and signed.

Our new search experience requires JavaScript to be enabled. Please enable JavaScript on your browser , then try again .

Our new search experience requires JavaScript to be enabled. Please enable JavaScript on your browser , then try again .

Even Donald Trump could learn something from the braggadocio on display at Maestro Dobel, which claims (among other superlatives), to be “the first-ever diamond tequila” … “unlike any other aged tequila” … the “result of a proprietary blending and filtration technique.” … “the liquid embodiment of my passion for tequila” … the result of “six generations of my family’s dedication to crafting the finest tequilas available” … and “a renaissance — a new way of thinking about and enjoying tequila.”

That’s a mouthful, and considering the just-released tequila costs $75 a bottle, it better stack up, eh? I put the good Maestro to the test and found it really intriguing and truly unusual in a world where many tequilas, even super-premium ones, can taste a lot alike.

Maestro Dobel is indeed a “new way” of making tequila: For starters, it’s a nearly clear, white spirit, but inside the bottle is aged tequila. At least three different aged tequilas are found in the blend inside the bottle (including reposado, anejo, and extra anejo expressions), but the spirit is then filtered to “gently expel congeners and colors from the tequila.” The how is “proprietary.” It’s kind of like the idea behind Crystal Pepsi : Flavor, yes. Color, no.

The flavor is wholly unexpected, especially if you’re not in on the whole decolorization thing: There’s vanilla, butterscotch, and woody oak where you’d normally get just the heat and vegetal notes of silver tequila. Agave is there, but understated, well mellowed by the aging process. You actually get more agave in the aroma than the taste, especially after the spirit opens up a little in the glass.

But for a blend of such well-aged tequilas, Dobel does clearly lose something along the way during all this filtration, and one can only imagine while sipping this mellow, almost “light” tequila, what the original base spirits must have tasted like. Is the colorless thing a gimmick or a real benefit to the drinker? If I feel like a million bucks tomorrow (those “expelled congeners” are what allegedly give you a hangover), that will be the real test to see whether Dobel is worth its Diamonds.

As a side note, the bottle alone deserves some discussion. It comes in an overly-tall decanter, with agave-like spikes molded into the lower portion of the glass. The base of the bottle is embedded into a built-in, metal coaster, and the label is forged from metal, too. Each bottle is individually numbered (mine is #292), dated, and signed.

Reserva del Maestro Dobel Diamond Reposado Tequila, a 100% Agave blend of Reposado, Anejo, and Extra Anejo Tequilas which have been gently filtered giving the Tequila an incredible Diamond Clarity and crispness.

Juan Dobel, working with Maestros Marco Anguiano and Luis Yerenas, wanted to create his own brand and offer Tequila Aficionados something truly unique. Each Agave used is grown for 8 to 10 years, and hand selected at one of a small number of our family's best quality producing ranches. This hand-crafted product is produced in small batches and aged in new oak casks from Southern Europe.

Juan-Dobel’s dedication to providing the finest hand-crafted tequila extends to Maestro Dobel’s meticulous packaging. Each imposing bottle is built on a thick metallic base and is emblazoned with a unique crystal-cut design. Each bottle is filled and labeled by hand and then individually numbered. Unique for tequila, Dobel recognizes the ranch from which the 8-10 year-old agave was harvested.

Tequila Reserva del Maestro * Tasted 10-21-08 * Riedel Tequila Glass

Appearance: very light straw, clear - full body and tears
Aroma: mild alcohol, light nose of fermented grapes, coffee, oak and vanilla
Initial Taste: sweet nut and chocolate, mild spice
Spirit Body: fruit and butter, hints of vanilla and mint, thick and warm
Finish / Aftertaste: warm and smooth finish, medium chocolate and mint aftertaste

A unique and mild spirit, containing many smooth aromas and flavors, minus the standard Agave attributes. Very drinkable. Tasted blind it would be difficult to categorize.

When I drank this tequila one word usually came to mind: dynamic. Every time I drank it I experienced a new taste. It was great. It was gone in no time though.

This was my first non blanco tequila aside from some mini bottles here and there.

The price on here is perhaps outdated or I just got really lucky when I bought it for $31.99. I would purchase this tequila again and would probably pay upwards of $50.00 if I had to.

Very disappointing tequila. The flavor was sharp, not smooth at all. I expected much, much more from this premium-priced tequila, and everyone I've shared it with has agreed that this is not worthy of the high price, nor the very high reviews it has received. Avoid this one.

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The nose is quite pleasant. There is nothing Jose Cuervo about this, even though Jose has shared many passages down our collective gullets in the past few decades. It is clean, with a hit of spice. So far so good. It is also surpassingly clear with no yellow or tan colors. I pour them neat, no ice, so my testing partner, Phil, and I can give it a good swig.

Glug glug glug we go, drinking slowly. I go through a glass, Phil goes through a glass. It is solid – this is definitely tequila – but it needs no cover-up or chaser. It’s the vodka of tequila, clear and crisp and just a hint that this would be good in a margarita. Time for two more pours.

Tasty, we decide. Very nice. I eschew following this with whiskey or beer because this is good tequila. $80 good? Yeah, sure. I’d buy it as a birthday present in leiu of a peaty scotch made on the Isle of Man. Another glass? Absolutely, Phil, coming right up. Let’s break out the Carcassone . Ok. I’ll be white. No, you can be white. Ok.

But, OK, this is acceptable. It’s energy, sure, but it’s a good drink. We drank half a bottle of tequila neat. We didn’t need lemon or salt or Mrs. Dash. We just took it down. That’s a testament to how good this stuff is. You want to drink it straight, even though all signs point to a chaser. There’s still a half a bottle to review but right now we’re a little tired. A+. Good stuff. Get you some.



 
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