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Our Word of the Year choice serves as a symbol of each year’s most meaningful events and lookup trends. It is an opportunity for us to reflect on the language and ideas that represented each year. So, take a stroll down memory lane to remember all of our sentence on humbug kit
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Our Word of the Year choice serves as a symbol of each year’s most meaningful events and lookup trends. It is an opportunity for us to reflect on the language and ideas that represented each year. So, take a stroll down memory lane to remember all of our past Word of the Year selections.

It wasn't trendy , funny, nor was it coined on Twitter , but we thought change told a real story about how our users defined 2010. Unlike in 2008, change was no longer a campaign slogan. But, the term still held a lot of weight. Here's an excerpt from our Word of the Year announcement in 2010 :

The national debate can arguably be summarized by the question: In the past two years, has there been enough change? Has there been too much? Meanwhile, many Americans continue to face change in their homes, bank accounts and jobs. Only time will tell if the latest wave of change Americans voted for in the midterm elections will result in a negative or positive outcome.

This rare word was chosen to represent 2011 because it described so much of the world around us. Tergiversate means "to change repeatedly one's attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc." Editors at Dictionary.com saw the stock market, political groups, and public opinion go through a roller coaster of change throughout 2011. And so, we named tergiversate the 2011 Word of the Year.

In a year known for the Occupy movement and what became known as the Arab Spring, our lexicographers chose bluster as their Word of the Year for 2012. Here's an excerpt from our release that year that gives a pretty good explanation for our choice:

2012 saw the most expensive political campaigns and some of the most extreme weather events in human history, from floods in Australia to cyclones in China to Hurricane Sandy and many others.

Meet the Leica CL , an interchangeable lens mirrorless camera with a 24 megapixel APS-C sensor. It uses Leica L mount and sits alongside the Leica TL2. The CL differs from the TL2 by offering an electronic viewfinder and a traditional control layout. Find out what else it's got going for it in our 90 second 'First look' video.

The reviews, by and large have been very positive. Its internals are based on the TL2. As a TL2 user, I can attest that the IQ is really tops. But why no USB nor HDMI ports?
I inadvertently forgot my SD card for the first time since I have been shooting digital going back to the old Nikon 995. If it were not for the 32GB built in memory of the TL2 and the USB port to retrieve the images, I would have been out of luck. These ports, while seldom used are still a relatively inexpensive feature that should remain as a standard digital camera feature. Leica, what were you thinking?

Unfortunately Leica is still insisting on what we want and keeps delvering other things. What we want is a camera with the size of a Leica Q with M lens mountability.

The Leica M10 pretty much fits the bill. Same height, only 7% wider, about the same thickness as the Q. Unless you meant a camera the size of the Q but with a built-in EVF. Here, you have to ask yourself whether (a) it is possible to create a good hybrid rangefinder-EVF or whether (b) there is a market for a non-rangefinder, ie, EVF-based, manual focus, M-lens based 'system'.

One way to answer that question is to explain the size difference in this picture:
http://www.reddotforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/50mm-SL-vs-50mm-M-size-comparison-side-1-768x510.jpg
(taken from: http://www.reddotforum.com/content/2017/03/leica-summilux-sl-50mm-f1-4-asph-review-a-new-standard/)

That may not be technical feasible right now without compromising quality. The Q is smaller than the M in large part because it has a leaf shutter embedded within the lens itself. This makes the lens bigger but the camera smaller. Regardless, the overall package ends up being smaller because there's no space wasted for the lens mounting mechanism and everything is optimized for a single lens. That, plus there's no space used up to make the Q weather resistant like the M. And finally, the Q is much lighter than the M because it's made of magnesium and aluminum instead of brass.

Our Word of the Year choice serves as a symbol of each year’s most meaningful events and lookup trends. It is an opportunity for us to reflect on the language and ideas that represented each year. So, take a stroll down memory lane to remember all of our past Word of the Year selections.

It wasn't trendy , funny, nor was it coined on Twitter , but we thought change told a real story about how our users defined 2010. Unlike in 2008, change was no longer a campaign slogan. But, the term still held a lot of weight. Here's an excerpt from our Word of the Year announcement in 2010 :

The national debate can arguably be summarized by the question: In the past two years, has there been enough change? Has there been too much? Meanwhile, many Americans continue to face change in their homes, bank accounts and jobs. Only time will tell if the latest wave of change Americans voted for in the midterm elections will result in a negative or positive outcome.

This rare word was chosen to represent 2011 because it described so much of the world around us. Tergiversate means "to change repeatedly one's attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc." Editors at Dictionary.com saw the stock market, political groups, and public opinion go through a roller coaster of change throughout 2011. And so, we named tergiversate the 2011 Word of the Year.

In a year known for the Occupy movement and what became known as the Arab Spring, our lexicographers chose bluster as their Word of the Year for 2012. Here's an excerpt from our release that year that gives a pretty good explanation for our choice:

2012 saw the most expensive political campaigns and some of the most extreme weather events in human history, from floods in Australia to cyclones in China to Hurricane Sandy and many others.

Our Word of the Year choice serves as a symbol of each year’s most meaningful events and lookup trends. It is an opportunity for us to reflect on the language and ideas that represented each year. So, take a stroll down memory lane to remember all of our past Word of the Year selections.

It wasn't trendy , funny, nor was it coined on Twitter , but we thought change told a real story about how our users defined 2010. Unlike in 2008, change was no longer a campaign slogan. But, the term still held a lot of weight. Here's an excerpt from our Word of the Year announcement in 2010 :

The national debate can arguably be summarized by the question: In the past two years, has there been enough change? Has there been too much? Meanwhile, many Americans continue to face change in their homes, bank accounts and jobs. Only time will tell if the latest wave of change Americans voted for in the midterm elections will result in a negative or positive outcome.

This rare word was chosen to represent 2011 because it described so much of the world around us. Tergiversate means "to change repeatedly one's attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc." Editors at Dictionary.com saw the stock market, political groups, and public opinion go through a roller coaster of change throughout 2011. And so, we named tergiversate the 2011 Word of the Year.

In a year known for the Occupy movement and what became known as the Arab Spring, our lexicographers chose bluster as their Word of the Year for 2012. Here's an excerpt from our release that year that gives a pretty good explanation for our choice:

2012 saw the most expensive political campaigns and some of the most extreme weather events in human history, from floods in Australia to cyclones in China to Hurricane Sandy and many others.

Meet the Leica CL , an interchangeable lens mirrorless camera with a 24 megapixel APS-C sensor. It uses Leica L mount and sits alongside the Leica TL2. The CL differs from the TL2 by offering an electronic viewfinder and a traditional control layout. Find out what else it's got going for it in our 90 second 'First look' video.

The reviews, by and large have been very positive. Its internals are based on the TL2. As a TL2 user, I can attest that the IQ is really tops. But why no USB nor HDMI ports?
I inadvertently forgot my SD card for the first time since I have been shooting digital going back to the old Nikon 995. If it were not for the 32GB built in memory of the TL2 and the USB port to retrieve the images, I would have been out of luck. These ports, while seldom used are still a relatively inexpensive feature that should remain as a standard digital camera feature. Leica, what were you thinking?

Unfortunately Leica is still insisting on what we want and keeps delvering other things. What we want is a camera with the size of a Leica Q with M lens mountability.

The Leica M10 pretty much fits the bill. Same height, only 7% wider, about the same thickness as the Q. Unless you meant a camera the size of the Q but with a built-in EVF. Here, you have to ask yourself whether (a) it is possible to create a good hybrid rangefinder-EVF or whether (b) there is a market for a non-rangefinder, ie, EVF-based, manual focus, M-lens based 'system'.

One way to answer that question is to explain the size difference in this picture:
http://www.reddotforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/50mm-SL-vs-50mm-M-size-comparison-side-1-768x510.jpg
(taken from: http://www.reddotforum.com/content/2017/03/leica-summilux-sl-50mm-f1-4-asph-review-a-new-standard/)

That may not be technical feasible right now without compromising quality. The Q is smaller than the M in large part because it has a leaf shutter embedded within the lens itself. This makes the lens bigger but the camera smaller. Regardless, the overall package ends up being smaller because there's no space wasted for the lens mounting mechanism and everything is optimized for a single lens. That, plus there's no space used up to make the Q weather resistant like the M. And finally, the Q is much lighter than the M because it's made of magnesium and aluminum instead of brass.

A huge well done to the Year 3 & 4 children who just finished 3 shows of their Christmas Play ‘Mr Humbug Sees The Light’ which was played out to a packed house on each performance! We hope you all enjoyed the show.

Year 3, and the rest of the school, were lucky enough to watch the brilliant performance of ‘I believe in Unicorns’ written by Michael Morpurgo and dramatised by Theatre Alibi.  The facial expressions of not only the characters, but the children in the audience was breathtaking as we were taken on an emotional journey.  A throroughly recommended book which tells the tale of a boy called Tomas who through the power of stories can’t help but believe in the magic of unicorns.  Do you believe in unicorns?

In the story the Unicorn Lady, who brings stories to life in the library, shares her favourite book with the children and explains why it is special to her.



 
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